The Secret Language of the Customer


How do you define ‘business’? Buying and selling? Doing deals? Money changing hands for something?

Any and all businesses, to be proper businesses at all, must or should be concerned with one thing and one thing only:

The end product of any business is to bring together the customer and the product or service that the customer needs or wants in an exact match.

Sounds obvious, doesn’t it?

But if you really understand this and apply it, this principle will guarantee lasting success for you.

Part of you will want to reject what you’re going to read here as too simple, too obvious or too wild to be real. You’ll be tempted at first to go off into the wilderness in order to be ‘original’ and ‘pioneering’ and depart from these principles. Many do.

The result? Universally unsuccessful businesses.

Many businessmen and women, in ignorance of the principles and models outlined in this book, tend to believe that customers are going to be somehow interested in what the business has to offer regardless of their needs. They build a ‘business-centric’ model. And then grow more and more frantic as it fails.

The truth is that customers look for certain things whether we like it or not. We look for those same things ourselves when we are customers. Fail to provide them and your customers will feel lost, mishandled, disengaged, even betrayed.

Instead, using vacuum power, you’ll have customers who are certain, co-operative, engaged and brimming with loyalty.

‘Business-centric’

At first glance, this thing called ‘business’ appears to be mainly just products and services created by people in the hope that someone will buy them.

But you can’t just create products or services in whatever way you like and expect them to sell or be used. If you don’t get a customer’s interest, you don’t get a sale and you don’t get a lasting success - and therefore certainly not customer commitment.